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The Effect of Glucose Concentration on the Rate of Osmosis - page 1

Keywords: Osmosis, potatoe, biology, GCSE, rate of osmosis, rate of reation, Glucose Concentration on the Rate of Osmosis

By abdul on 20/11/2006 17:20:23

Level: GCSE Key Stage 4 (Years 10-11)

Page Number: 1 of 10   pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

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The Effect of Glucose Concentration on the Rate of Osmosis

Aims

In this investigation I’ll be working to know:
• How does the concentration of glucose solution affect the rate of osmosis in potato chips?
• Why does the concentration of glucose solution affect the rate of osmosis in potato chips?
• How does the mass of potato chips changes in different concentration glucose solutions?

Introduction

The purpose of this investigation is to observe the factors that affect the rate of osmosis in potato chips and investigate the movement of osmosis through the cells of potato.

Background information

Diffusion is the net movement of particles from a region of high concentration to a region of low concentration until the concentrations are equal. The speed of diffusion depends n the differences between the concentrations to begin with.

Osmosis is a special type of diffusion, it occurs across a permeable membrane which allows some particles to diffuse through it and prevent others. Therefore osmosis is the passage of water from a region of high concentration to a region of low concentration through a semi-permeable membrane.
The direction and the rate of osmosis depend on the difference in water concentration between the two sides of the membrane and this movement will continue until equilibrium is reached.
Cell membranes will allow small molecules like oxygen or water or carbon dioxide or glucose to pass through but they will prevent larger molecules like sucrose or starch or protein to pass through.
The tendency of water to move through a partially permeable membrane is described as its water potential and is at a maximum in pure water. As solutes are added the water potential lowers and this means that more concentrated solutions have lower water potentials than more dilute solutions and so the water will have a greater tendency to move from pure water to any aqueous solution and from a more dilute solution to a more concentrated solution.
The cytoplasm of a plant cell and the cell sap in the vacuole contain salts, sugars and proteins which effectively reduce the concentration of free water molecules inside the cell. The cell wall of a plant cell is freely permeable to water and dissolved substances but the cell membrane of the cytoplasm is partially permeable. If plant is surrounded by water or a solution more dilute than its contents water will pass into the vacuole by osmosis and the vacuole will expand and press outwards on the cytoplasm and

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The Effect of Glucose Concentration on the Rate of Osmosis- page 1